Tag Archives: SFCR

Analysis of Solvency and Financial Condition Reports for Irish life insurers

Solvency II came into effect on 1 January 2016 and introduced a number of disclosure requirements for European insurers. Under the new rules, European insurers are required to publish a Solvency and Financial Condition Report (SFCR). The third set of SFCRs contains a significant amount of information, including details on business performance, risk profile, balance sheet, and capital position. Insurers are also required to publish quantitative information in the public Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs) included within the SFCRs. This analysis by Milliman’s Matthew McIlvannaSinéad Clarke and Aisling Barrett highlights some interesting information published in the SFCRs of life insurance companies in Ireland at year-end 2018, focussing on premiums, investments and solvency coverage.

Brief study of UK health insurers’ second SFCRs

This analysis by Milliman consultants compares information provided in Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs) and Solvency and Financial Condition Reports (SFCRs) and draws conclusions about the balance sheets and risk exposures of 15 UK private medical insurance and health cash plan providers. The analysis also highlights noteworthy trends between the 2017 and 2018 publications.




Analysis of Dutch insurers’ Solvency and Financial Condition Reports

In May 2017, the first Solvency and Financial Condition Reports (SFCRs) were published for year-end 2016. This report by Milliman consultants provides a summary of key solvency information related to various life and non-life insurance entities in the Netherlands based on their SFCRs. The report also focuses on the largest consolidated insurance groups.




Brief study of UK health insurers’ first SFCRs

Solvency and Financial Condition Reports (SFCRs) contain a number of Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs). They are an important source of information on a company’s financial position under Solvency II. This report by Milliman’s Joanne Buckle and Didier Serre compares and contrasts the information in selected QRTs of 13 health insurers in the United Kingdom.




Central Bank shines a light on anomalies in Solvency II Pillar 3 reporting

This blog is part of the Pillar 3 Reporting series. For more blogs in this series click here.

The Central Bank of Ireland (CBI) held an industry workshop on 21 November aimed at practitioners who prepare the Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs) and, to a less extent, the Solvency and Financial Condition Report (SFCR). Despite the wet and wintry conditions, the session was very well attended and there was plenty of engagement from industry attendees. The CBI expressed concern regarding the level of errors in the Solvency II submissions, calling into question the processes, review and governance in place in (re)insurance companies.

This blog post outlines some of the highlights from the workshop:

• There has been a surprisingly high rate of resubmissions of quarterly and annual QRTs to date. For Q1 2016, it was as high as 70%. There is now a consistent resubmission rate at approximately 30%.

• The CBI pointed out that it commits significant resources to identifying and querying errors each quarter. In turn companies also spend time and effort remediating these issues. They see this as an unanticipated cost for both themselves and the industry.

• The most common errors relate to missing data on the list of assets template (S.06.02) and confusion around country classification for premiums, claims and expenses (templates S.04.01, S.05.01 and S.05.02).

• The CBI believes it has taken a pragmatic approach to QRT errors for the first 18 months of reporting, working with companies to remediate errors. However, it was clear that it would consider taking a harder line from next year onwards.

• The CBI specifically pointed to the Directors’ Accuracy Certificate, which relates to annual reporting only. In cases of persistent reporting errors by a company, the CBI intends to contact signing directors and may ask them to outline the governance and review processes in place.

• The CBI is carrying out some on-site inspections in relation to Solvency II reporting processes, with a particular focus on governance and review of submissions.

• In addition to the automatic cross-checks on the CBI’s Online Reporting System, it also outlined some of the additional quality assurance checks it carries out on receipt of QRTs. In order to assist companies in this regard, the CBI has prepared a spreadsheet with a list of these checks. It expects companies to build in these checks to their own processes before submitting templates.

• The CBI has also added an SFCR repository to its website. This contains the SFCR reports of insurance companies that are regulated by the CBI and is a useful resource for the industry. The CBI’s SFCR repository can be found here.

As such, a clear message has been sent to the industry regarding Pillar 3 reporting. The challenge will be in automating processes, streamlining review and tightening up the governance in this area.

I include links to both the slides from the industry workshop and the additional quality assurance checks spreadsheet.

Milliman STAR Solutions® – VEGA® is an automated Pillar 3 reporting and standard formula aggregation system. One of the key features of VEGA is inbuilt XBRL functionality and validations, ensuring the QRTs meet the CBI’s requirements before uploading to the Online Reporting System.




SFCR: Sales insights

This blog is part of the Pillar 3 Reporting series. For more blogs in this series click here.

Following the first annual reporting deadline under Solvency II, I look at premium income figures as reported by Irish insurance companies.

The figures below are based on an analysis of 47 Solvency and Financial Condition Reports (SFCRs), which cover all the major Irish-domiciled insurers.

Life Breakdown
Based on the SFCRs in our analysis, total premiums received in respect of life business during 2016 were €40.2 billion. This reflects all premiums, including both new business and regular premiums and top-ups on existing business, and is gross of outward reinsurance. We believe this represents approximately 85% of the total Irish-domiciled market, implying total premiums of approximately €47 billion.

Cross-border companies are an important feature of the Irish insurance market and this is reflected in the premium figures, with 68% of premiums written outside of Ireland and the remaining 32% written in Ireland.

The majority of cross-border business written from Ireland is written in the Italian market. Almost three-quarters of cross-border premiums in 2016 were to the Italian market. The next largest cross-border life market is the UK, with 11% of cross-border premiums.

In terms of types of business sold, there is a wide range of business sold by Irish life insurers. While the SFCR disclosures don’t necessarily disclose the exact details of products sold, they do provide a breakdown of premiums by Solvency II line of business. It should be noted that a single product may be unbundled across several lines of business in these statistics e.g., a unit-linked product with a return of premium guarantee will be split across ‘unit-linked’ and ‘other life insurance.’

Perhaps not surprisingly, life premiums are dominated by unit-linked business (82.6%). Of the remainder, reinsurance business accounts for over 14% between life and health business, reflecting Dublin’s position as a centre for reinsurance.

Please note that private health insurance is classified under non-life business and health insurance here refers to products such as long-term care.

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