Tag Archives: Molly Barth

Record-setting wildfires put homeowners insurance in jeopardy

As the 2020 wildfire season again exceeds historical norms, insurers and policymakers must turn their attention from the literal fires to the figurative one: the threat—and increasing likelihood—that this escalating wildfire risk will result in a homeowners insurance crisis in the state of California.

For homeowners, insurance is often the last line of defense against losing everything to wildfire. However, for many, this crucial financial backstop is rapidly becoming harder to obtain as insurers reduce their portfolios due to billions in losses and regulatory restrictions on reflecting the true cost of risk in the premiums charged. This withdrawal is creating an untenable situation for many Californians and efforts to address it are becoming an urgent priority for policy makers.

In this article, Milliman professionals explain in more detail the state of home insurance in California and the regulatory efforts to address the issues thus far.

How will climate gentrification affect homeowners and the communities they live in?

The visibility of climate change’s impact on property hazard is increasingly leading individuals and their chosen leaders to ask: how might an increase in hazard affect the desirability of living in various communities and how do we manage the socioeconomic effects? Recent stories have highlighted the concerns of “climate gentrification,” or potential migration from low-lying but relatively well-off areas to areas of higher elevation but sometimes higher poverty.

Milliman has worked with Jupiter Intelligence, a climate risk analytics provider of forward-looking and probabilistic hazard data for future conditions, to develop a framework for analysis that may spark insight for community leaders in the public and private sectors who are charged with managing climate change and planning for a resilient future. This paper by Molly Barth and John Rollins investigates insurance risk, consumer costs, and resilience incentives under the stress of a changing climate in Broward and Miami-Dade counties.